US makes ‘adjustments’ to Daesh strikes amid ‘tensions’ in Syria

The United States and its allies are pulling back on airstrikes to allegedly target Daesh terrorists in Syria in the wake of US missile strikes against an airbase under the control of the Syrian government, which drew Russia’s ire.

US warships deployed to the eastern Mediterranean launched a barrage of 59 Tomahawk missiles against Shayrat Airfield, southeast of the western Syrian city of Homs, on Friday. Washington, without providing any evidence, alleged that the attack came in response to a chemical attack by the Syrian government in Khan Shaykhun.

The missile attack, which faced condemnation by Russia, Iran as well as the Syrian government, appeared to be the reason behind the “adjustments” the US-led coalition is making.

“We have made adjustments to our operations to account for the potential tensions that resulted from the strikes that were conducted because of the Syrian regime’s chemical attack,” Colonel John Dorrian, the spokesman for Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve, told reporters at the Pentagon on Wednesday.

The spokesman further asserted that the so-called coalition would continue its operations against the Daesh de facto capital, Raqqah, in northern Syria.